Quick Beef Pho Recipe with Quoc Viet Foods' Pho Soup Base  

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chuynh
Posts: 410
(@chuynh)
Pho Restaurant Consultant
Joined: 11 years ago

Quoc Viet Foods logoUpdated 03-14-18. There's nothing like enjoying a bowl of pho at your favorite pho shop with your pho companions. But there are times, for various reasons, you'd like to make pho yourself at home.

Most good pho recipes like Andrea Nguyen's or Didier Corlou's call for cooking the bone and meat in broth for up to 2.5 to 3 hours. Other recipes call for even longer simmering. Adding other preparation time, including the time to bring water to boil, drain and reboil, and you're looking at maybe 4-5 hours total cook time at least. So for those who want to take a shortcut and shave off a few hours, try the Quoc Viet Foods Beef Flavored "Pho" Soup Base option.

Full disclosure: I’m neither associated with Quoc Viet nor am I sponsored in any way by the company for any article on LovingPho.com.

Quoc Viet Foods makes shelf storable soup bases, seasonings, coffee and tea. When it comes to authenticity, it's always a challenge to find ready-made food products, including Vietnamese pho. Yet Quoc Viet seems to achieve the impossible for pho, that is to "convert the traditional Vietnamese products into a convenient form" while maintaining the flavor expected of such product. This means for those who never made pho or tasted pho, they can now get very close to the real thing, easily.

You can read more about my other post on Quoc Viet Foods. But enough about the company. Let's get to the goodness of their Beef Flavored "Pho" Soup Base.

The package comes in a compact round plastic container. The wraparound label clearly describes the content and includes an ingredient list, nutrition information and cooking directions in English, Viet and Chinese. While the nutrition info states that there are 32 servings per container, the cooking directions indicate it makes 20 bowls. Confusing, but still very nice! At a price of US$ 6.99 per container, I'm paying US$ 0.35 for the broth in each of my pho bowls, excluding a few other ingredients of course.

Inside the container are the powdered soup base with marrow, and 2 bags of spices. I should point out that the soup base itself is not loose powder as you may expect. Rather, because there is beef fat included (to give you the correct flavor), what you have is actually more like a grainy paste with a greasy consistency.

But don't let my description scares you. This is normal and it is the good stuff. The soup base is the key part of the pho broth and is essentially your "instant" bone/bone marrow solution that you didn't have to cook for 2-3 hours. As already mentioned, it packs plenty of beef fats which you can skim off at serving time if you wish, but I wouldn't do that. It's the good stuff (I know, I already said this).

The spice bags are your normal star anise, cinnamon, and various other spices. What's awesome about the soup base/spice bag combination is they give you all you need for the broth, including all seasonings that you need-I added some fish sauce but it's really not required. The only other things you'll need are the ginger and onion which should be charred or grilled before use in the broth, and the meat.


Quoc Viet Foods Beef Soup Base

Quoc Viet Foods Beef Soup Base


Quoc Viet beef soup base nutrition facts

Quoc Viet Foods Beef Soup Base Nutrition Facts



Quoc Viet beef soup base cooking instructions

Quoc Viet Foods Beef Soup Base cooking instructions


Quoc Viet Foods Beef Soup Base package content

Quoc Viet Foods Beef Soup Base package content


The direction is very easy to follow. You'll have to buy your preferred meat to cook, but this whole process entirely does away with having to buy the bone/oxtail and cooking them to get to the marrow, and to purchase the spices separately. For my broth I bought 2.8 pounds of beef flank, a piece of ginger and a medium size onion. The required ingredients list and cooking directions can be viewed from the photos above, but here's a recap which is better to follow:

REQUIRED INGREDIENTS:

  • 3-4 lbs, beef flank or brisket, cut into 4-5 inch pieces for better cooking,
  • 1 lb, beef tendon*,
  • 1 bulb, onion,
  • 2 pieces, ginger.

DIRECTIONS:

  • Blanch meats for 15 minutes. Discard dirty water and rinse meats.
  • (Step not in package direction): Char or grill the onion and ginger pieces. I cut my onion in half, but it’s your choice to do so or not. You can char over open flame or broil in your oven. It’s okay to char (let burned or blackened) the outside a little bit.
  • Put meat pieces in a large pot and add enough water to cover them. Bring to boil then simmer at medium flame for 1 hour. Add onion, ginger about half way through.
  • After about 1 hour, add spice bags and content of soup base. Important: Do not tear spice filter bags.
  • After 15 minutes, remove spice bags. Continue simmer at medium flame until meats are softened. Note: you can leave spice bags in longer for more pho flavor, and remove when you think ready.
  • Remove meats, onion and ginger pieces.
  • Adjust water to 2 gallons or to taste.
  • Also add fish sauce per your preference. Remember: start with small amount and add more as needed.
  • Bring to boil and serve.

* The meats and tendon are optional, or you can also substitute/add tripe, meatballs, etc. depending on your preference, just as you would order in a restaurant. See my “Tips on Ordering Pho Your Way.”

NOTE: The above constitutes recipe for the broth only. To serve a complete pho meal, you’ll need to separately prepare other ingredients such as the banh pho noodle, chopped scallions and cilantro, etc.


Quoc Viet beef soup base cooking potFor me I ended up with so much broth that I had to divide into 3 smaller containers, put 2 in the freezer and enjoy the third portion over a few days. Again the key was the soup base which is all inclusive. There are no seasonings required as the soup base is super concentrated, and you can add water to adjust to taste.

My total cooking time was about 3 hours, but that's just me because making and eating pho is a religion for me 😉 so I took my time. For others who just want to get quickly to a nice steaming bowl of pho with chopsticks and spoon in hands, you can probably do it in 1.5 hours or less. The determining factor will be how tender you want the cooked meat to be.

Actually, the 3 hours that I spent to create the large volume of broth means that the next time I want to eat pho at home, I can have it as fast as I can prep the ingredients, cook the noodle, and re-thermalize (fancy word for reheat) the broth. Awesome!

To speed up cooking time even more, an alternative is to cut smaller pieces of beef (hence cutting down cooking time further) and/or use pre-cooked meatballs instead. The latter option means that you wouldn't be cooking any meat in the broth at all, as you depend totally on the soup base for the flavors. By the way, for those unfamiliar with meatballs, you don't cook them in the broth for the whole duration. Just heat them in the broth just before serving.

Finally I rate my pho broth creation using Quoc Viet  Foods' Beef Flavored Pho Soup Base as follows:

  • Quality and taste: 8/10.
  • Convenience: 10/10.
  • Affordability: 10/10.
  • Total value (quality & affordability): 9/10.

You can find this and other Quoc Viet products in many Viet and Chinese food markets in the 50 U.S. states, Denmark, Canada and Japan. Quoc Viet's website indicates their products include

  1. Chicken Flavored "Pho" Soup Base
  2. Beef Flavored "Pho" Soup Base
  3. Beef Stew Seasoning
  4. "Hue" Style Beef Flavored Soup Base
  5. Chicken Flavored Soup Base
  6. Pork Flavored "Hu Tieu" Soup Base
  7. Pork Flavored Soup Base
  8. Tamarind Soup Base
  9. Vegetarian Soup Base
  10. Crab Flavored Soup Base
  11. Thai Tom Yum Soup Base

Unfortunately Quoc Viet is a wholesaler and does not sell directly to consumers over the Internet. The company is also very active at local demos, festivals, and charity fund drives, so if you're lucky you can catch them in action serving pho to hungry pho fans at these events.

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141 Replies

Joel
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 Joel
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Joined: 10 years ago

Thank You so much!!! ive been a huge fan of pho for a while and always found the process of making it for myself too overwhelming. This helped me out immensely! Should i cut up my ginger into pieces?

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chuynh
Posts: 410
(@chuynh)
Pho Restaurant Consultant
Joined: 11 years ago

Hi Joel: There are several ways to char the ginger. Some people will cut it in half length-wise to get more of its surface to char. Others char it whole. Still others peel its skin before charring. I would say take your pick, but personally I cut the ginger in half after peeling. This gives me better flavors due to larger charring surface.

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Joel
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 Joel
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Thanks a bunch!

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Orlando
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 Orlando
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Joined: 9 years ago

Joel,

I've been an asian noodle fan since I was a kid and can't get enough. I only go for the authentic stuff and find the stepped on versions a big disappointment. I've been looking for a good soup base and purchased this one a few months ago. After much research in making PHO the long way I have a couple of questions about this soup base. Should I use the whole container and and freeze the rest for later? How should I portion the container so I'm not wasting?

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chuynh
Posts: 410
(@chuynh)
Pho Restaurant Consultant
Joined: 11 years ago

Hi Orlando: Brian at Quoc Viet told me that the soup base is stable at room temperature for storage purpose. Even if you opened the container to use just a portion of the powder, the rest can be closed up and stored away in your pantry for months (I have to look at my notes to see if it was 9 months or something else that he said.) Of course you can throw it in your fridge too, no harm doing that.

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sanghuynh
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 sanghuynh
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Joined: 9 years ago

Hi Cuong, I would like 2 know that these soupbase contain any MSG ? I heard on youtube ppl said that these soupbases are no good b.cause they have so much sodium and MSG. Thanks

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chuynh
Posts: 410
(@chuynh)
Pho Restaurant Consultant
Joined: 11 years ago

Hi SangHuynh: Can you provide a link to the YouTube page you mentioned? I'd like to check it out myself. With respect to the Quoc Viet soup base which is what this article is about, I think it does have large amount of sodium, as are many many other processed foods. If anyone has ever enjoyed restaurant foods, any restaurant foods, I think he/she should expect a large amount of sodium and/or MSG in the food as well. I do admit though, many of them are great tasting 😉 In all seriousness, I would say if you are allergic to MSG then preparing your own food is the best way to go.

Here's a post on MSG where a number of culinary professionals pitched in their own take on MSG, Vietnamese Pho With No Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)? Sure You Want It That Way? For me moderation is my rule for consuming MSG.

Finally, you can also contact the product manufacturer directly.

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